The following article is a part of conference coverage from the Advances in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases 2021 Annual Meeting , held from December 9 to 11, 2021. The team at Gastroenterology Advisor will be reporting on the latest news and research conducted by leading experts in gastroenterology. Check back for more from AIBD 2021.

 

Many patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a negative perception of their sleep quality, particularly patients who have moderate disease activity, according to research presented at the Advances in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (AIBD) 2021 Annual Meeting, held from December 9 to 11, 2021, in Orlando, Florida and virtually.


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According to the investigators, sleep disorders are highly prevalent in patients with IBD, but research on the association between inadequate sleep quality and disease activity has historically been scarce. The researchers added that poor sleep quality in the IBD patient population may be a clinically “relevant extraintestinal manifestation,” as well as a possible inflammatory marker, and may “increase the severity of inflammation and the risk of relapse.”

To further investigate these statements, a team of researchers from Mexico conducted an observational, cross-sectional study on the impact of IBD on sleep in 51 patients (mean age, 52 years; 55% women). The majority of the cohort (65%) had ulcerative colitis (UC). Sleep quality was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), while the Harvey-Bradshaw index for Crohn disease (CD) and the Mayo scale for Ulcerative Colitis (UC) were used to assess IBD activity.

Approximately 70.5% of patients were receiving biological therapy, but 80% of patients did not use hypnotic drugs. In the patients with CD, 89% were in remission and 11% had moderate disease activity. In the UC group, 48.5% were in remission and 45.5% of patients had mild disease activity, while 6% of patients had moderate activity.

In the group of patients with UC who were in remission, 68% had a negative perception of their sleep quality, while only 18% of patients rated their sleep quality as “quite good” and 12% rated their sleep quality as “very good.” The PSQI was 10.5±3.2 in patients with UC in remission.

A subanalysis of patients with UC with mild activity showed only 6% perceived their sleep quality as “very good,” while 46% rated their sleep quality as “quite good”, and 40% of patients rated their sleep quality as “quite bad.” Another 6% of patients with mild UC activity rated their sleep quality as “very bad,” and the PSQI of the mild activity group was 8±3.7. All patients (100%) with moderate UC activity had a rather negative perception of sleep quality (PSQI, 11±1.4).

In the group of patients with CD in remission, the perception of sleep quality was “quite bad” in 43%, “quite good” in 43%, “very bad” in 6%, and “very good” in 6% (overall PSQI, 9±4.3). Among the subgroup with moderate disease activity, half (50%) had a “very bad” perception of their sleep quality, while the other half had a “fairly good” sleep quality perception (overall PSQI, 14±4.2).

The researchers wrote that “due to the sample size, a prospective, randomized study is required to confirm these findings.”

Visit Gastroenterology Advisor’s meetings section for complete coverage of AIBD 2021.

 

Reference

Korely TF, Jesús LG, Tomas CE, et al. Impact of inflammatory bowel disease on sleep quality in a Mexican population attended in a referral center. Presented at: AIBD 2021 Annual Meeting; December 9-11, 2021; Orlando, FL and virtual. Abstract P061.